Scroll-Sawing Machines. August M. Schilling, Chicago, 111. This in ventionhas for its object to furnish an improved scroll-sawing machine, which snail b e so constructed and arranged that holes may be sawn with facility and accuracy, without its being necessary to stop the.saw to introduce the material to be sawn. Broadcast Seedee. Matthew Sackett, Monticello, Iowa. This invention has for its object to furnish an improved broadcast seeder, designed especially for sowing timothy, clover, and other small seeds, and which be simple in construction and convenient in use. Corn Planter. Peter Rogers, Sharon, Ohio. This invention has for its object to furnish an improved machine for planting corn, which shall be simple in construction, reliable and accurate in operation, and convenient in use; being so constructed and arranged that the dropping device may be readily thrown out of gear, allowing the machine to be turned or backed without dropping the corn, and which may be turned in a small space. Stovepipe Shelf. John P. Sherwood, Fort Edward, N. Y. This invention has for its object to furnish an improved detachable and adjustable shelf for attachment to stovespipes, which shall be simple in construction, and easily attached, detached, and adjusted. Raking Attachment for Reapers. Charles Barns, Oskaloosa, Iowa. This invention has for its object to furnish an improved raking attachment for reapers, which shall be so constructed and arranged as to take the grain, as it crops from the cutters, and deliver it to the binders or upon the ground, as maybe desired, and which shall, at the same time, be simple in construction and effective in operation. Horseshoe Nail Clincher. E. E. Fislier and William H. Mack, Indian-ola, 111. This invention has for its object to furnish a simple, convenient, and effective instrument for turning down and clinching horseshoe nails, so as to obviate the necessity for the use of the rasp, hammer, and clinching iron, while doing the work neater and better. Cultivator. John Powell, Sullivan, 111. This invention relates to improvements in cultivators, or gang plows, and has for its object to provide a more simple and convenient arrangement of means for vibrating the plows laterally, adjusting than to vary the distance apart, and to govern their depth of cutting. Soldering Apparatus. Conrad Seimel, Greenpoint, N. Y. This invention relates to a new apparatus for soldering the upper and lower edges of sheet-metal cans of cylindrical, prismatic, or other shape. It consists in providing an adjustable cover for the annular or other vessel in which the solder is kept, so that by forcing the said cover down, by means of suitable levers, the solder will be forced into the soldering pan, wherein it will rise to a suitable desired hight to surround the edge of the can to be soldered. When the levers are released, the covers will be raised by spring or weight, and will draw the solder back into the closed vessel in which it is protected from the injurious influences of the air. The soldering pan is endless, either round, square, or oblong, or of other suitable form, according to the shape of the box to be soldered. Combined Knife and Fork. Arthur W. Cox, Maiden, Mass. The object of this invention is to provide a combined knife and fork, better adapted for the double use than any now made, and intended more especially for use by persons who have but one hand. Adjustable Reamers. Henry James, Hudson, N. Y. This invention relates to improvements in adjustable reamers, whereby it is designed to provide an improved arrangement of two or more cutters, upon a stock tobe adjusted by screwing a nut forward and back upon the shank of the stock. Machinery for Ginning Cotton. B. Dobson and Wm. Slater, Bolton, England. This invention consists, first, in applying ;to saw gins, which are provided with one or two sets of saws, a treadle lever, by which the feeding hopper may be agitated to clear the teeth of the saws, and to discharge the seeds and impurities, so that, when such treadles are used, the hands of the operator may remain at liberty; secondly, in applying to saw gins which are provided with one or two sets of saws, a fan, and two perforated metal cylinders, in which a partial vacuum is formed by the fan, to withdraw dust and other impurities from the ginned cotton passing over said cylinders ; thirdly, in applying to, and in the aforesaid perforated cylinders, stationary dampers, by which the action of the vacuum is destroyed on those parts of the cylinder which deposits the cotton upon a feed apron, or other suitable apparatus. Self-locking Cover for Coal Holes, Scuttles, etc. Morison Hoyt, Brooklyn, N-. Y., and G. Van Cleef, New York city. This invention has for its object to furnish an improved cover for coal holes, scuttles, hatchways, etc., which shall be so constructed m to fasten itself when dropped into place without the possibility of failure, and in such a way that the cover cannot be removed from the outside. Paint Mills.-John A. Berrill, Waterville, N. Y. This invention has for its object to improve the construction of paint mills, so that the ground paintmay be more conveniently collected from the mill and guided into the receiving vessel. Portable Fence. Joseph Richard, Columbiaville, Mich. This invention has for its object to furnish an improved portable ijence, which shall be simple in construction, strong, and durable, easily put up, taken down, or moved from place to place, and which can be easily and readily repaired when required. Horse Collar. B. W. McClure, Wyoming, Iowa. This invention has for its object to furnish a simple, convenient, and cheap horse collar, which shall be so constructed that it may be used without harness. Co-elk Sheller. S. S. Cole, Henryville, Ind. This inventionhas for its object to furnish an improved corn sheller, whichshallbe so constructed and arranged as to do its work quickly and thoroughly, while, at the same time, it maybe mamifactured at small expense, and thus brought within the reach of all farmers, even those of limited means. Brick and Mortar Hod. E.B. Black, Joseph Hinkle, Jr., and T. S. White, Columbia, Pa. This invention has for its object t o furnish a n improved hod for carrying brick and mortar, which shall be stronger, more durable, less expensive, and equally as light as, or lighter than the ordinary wooden hod. Attachment for Adjusting Cobds for Hanging Pictures, etc. R. d'Heureuse, New York city. This invention has for its object to furnish an improved attachment for cords for hanging pictures, glasses, and for other purposes, by means of which the cords may be easily and quickly taken up and let out, for adjusting the hanging of the suspended object, without forming knots in the cords or untying knots previously formed. FounderyFlasks for Sugar Kettles. George Walworth, Peekskill, N.Y. This invention relates to a new and useful improvement in flasks for making certain kinds of castings, but which has more particular reference to the molding and casting of sugar kettles. Combined Foot-stool and Foot-warmer. Jacques Jacquet, Newark, N. J. The object of this invention is to produce an apparatus for travelers and others, which shall at once serve as a convenient foot-stool, and also as a foot-warmer in winter. Boiler Scraper. Monroe Morse and Charles H. Morse, Franklin, Mass. This invention relates to a new self-adjusting boiler scraper, which is composed of a bent plate having straight sides, so that all its edges will form cutting edges within the tube to be cleaned. Thereby quicker operation is obtained with simpler apparatus than with the devices heretofore used. Hop House. William Loof bourow, Fayette, Wis. This invention relates to a new building for drying and storing hops; it being so arranged that the hops therein can be easily handled and conveniently conveyed in the building from the cooling to the drying, and thence to the storing room. Whips. Edgar Easton, Ashland, 111. This invention relates to improvements in the construction of driver's whips, having for its object to provide an improved means of securing the lashes to the handles or stalks. It consists in forming a knob on the end of the stalk andbraiding the lash thereon in a manner to form a swivel connection. Automatic Raker. C. Lidren, La Fayette, Ind. This invention relates to a new and useful improvement in the method of operating automatic rakers for reaping or harvesting machines, whereby the mechanism for operating suCh fakes is very much simplified. Device for Practicing the Handling of Violins and Bows. Stephen Upson, New York city. This invention has for its object to teach beginners the manner of handling the bows of violins and equivalent instruments, and the mode of using the fingers and practicing the shifts on the fingerboard of the instrument without producing anynoise,and without exposing valuable instruments to the risk of being spoiled by the practitioners. Skate. Moses Kinsey, Newark, N. J. This invention relates to a new ad justable skate, which can be applied to larger or smaller feet, and conven -iently attached and taken off. The invention consists, chiefly, in the application of two plates, which are pivoted to the front of the skate, and which extend to the rear of the same, they being adjustable at any angle to each other by means of a screw. These plates carry the front and heel fastening clamps, which are moreover laterally adjustable on them. The invention also consists in the use of adjustable wedge-shaped heel clamps, which are adapted to firmly secure heels of all sizes and shapes to the skate. Combined Spinning Wheel and Churn. Morgan A. McAfee, Talbot-ton, Ga. The object of this invention is to provide an arrangement whereby a common spinning wheel may be economically and conveniently arranged for employment as a propelling medium for a churn ; also to provide certain improvements in churns. Car Coupling. I. L.Vansant, Glasgow, Del. The object of this invention is to provide a simple, cheap, and effective automatic car coupling, constructed so as to avoid the use of springs of any kind. Water Elevator. Charles F. Woodruff, Newbern, Tenn. This invention is an improvement upon the devices patented by the same inventor February 4th and September 15th, 1868, and consists in a combination in one machine of the main features covered by said two patents, thereby producing a more simple and permanent, and less expensive water elevator than either of the old ones. Breech-loading Firearm Wm. Golcher, St. Paul, Minn. In this invention, by moving a single lever, the breech of the barrel is thrown up, the gun cocked and held in that position, and the old cartridge shell retracted ; by returning the lever to its original position, the barrel is brought down to its proper position for firing, aad the gun is left cocked and instantly discharged. The whole apparatus is exceedingly simple, cheap, and not liable to get out of order, and its use will enable the gun to be fired much more rapidly and with less labor than heretofore.