THE new comet discovered in July by Dr. William R. Brooks, director of the Smith Observatory, Geneva, N. Y., is now visible to the naked eye, and in a very favorable position for observation on the western side of Pegasus. The comet has moved up through the northern part of Cygnus, and on September 10th was about 20 degrees northwest of Vega, the brilliant star in the constellation Lyra, and now overhead in the early evening. This was its greatest north declination, about 57 degrees. From this place the comet is moving frst westerly, then southwesterly as it speeds toward the sun. The following ephemeris will show the comet's track through the northwestern heavens. Those not having telescopes with graduated circles, can plot these positions upon a good star atlas, and thus get the comet's relative plac to the well marked stars in its course: September. R. A. N. DecJiuQtion. 13 17 hrs. 10 min. +57 deg. 9 min. 17 16 “ 18 “ 55 “ 42 “ 21 15 “ 31 “ 53 “ 00 “ 25 14 “ 51 “ 49 “ 21 “ 29 14 “ 17 “ 44 “ 58 “ October. 3 13 “ 49 “ 40 “ 6 .. 7 13 “ 26 “ 34 “ 51 “ The comet was nearest the earth on September 17th, when its distance was 45,000,000 miles. While the comet is visible to the naked eye, an opera or feld glasS will add to the pleasure of the observation.