After a two-year shutdown for $163 million in upgrades, the world's largest particle accelerator is booting back up this spring. Among other improvements, the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva now has better connections between its magnets, which will support stronger fields and enable protons to crash together at the highest energies ever achieved. New particles could provide long-sought proof for theories such as supersymmetry that posit extra particles and dimensions in the universe. The collisions might even reveal new, heavier Higgs bosons to join the first Higgs discovery there in 2012.

 
SOURCE: FRÉDÉRICK BORDRY, DIRECTOR FOR ACCELERATORS AND TECHNOLOGY CERN (BY THE NUMBERS FIGURES)