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Stories by Anne Casselman

Getting the Grizzly Story: What Its Like to Report in Canada's Great Bear Rainforest

Editor's note: This post is part of a four-part series that Anne Casselman, a freelance writer and regular contributor to Scientific American , reported in early June during a rare opportunity to conduct field reporting on grizzly bears in Heiltsuk First Nation traditional territory in British Columbia.

August 8, 2011 — Anne Casselman

Is salmon farming bad for the oceans?

We are as close to the salmon cages as we can get, telephoto lenses out, video rolling. From our vantage point, fisherman Reid Brown's 45-foot boat the Rebecca and Shelley, we don't see any salmon but the seabirds clamoring around the raised salmon cages are excited about something here in Passamaquoddy Bay on the Bay of Fundy.

November 17, 2010 — Anne Casselman

Salmon farms in the Bay of Fundy worry fishermen

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet, led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

October 27, 2010 — Anne Casselman

What is stormwater runoff, and why does it matter?

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet , led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

October 21, 2010 — Anne Casselman

Electroshocking for fish at the Kingston Coal-Ash Spill Site

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet , led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

September 28, 2010 — Anne Casselman

On eve of EPA hearings, scientists sample lake for coal-ash toxins

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet, led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

September 15, 2010 — Anne Casselman