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Stories by Environmental Health News

Infants Exposed to Hormone-Disrupting Chemical

A study of 125 babies in Finland found exposure to phthalates "at a potentially harmful level," according to new research. The sources of the chemicals are unknown

June 10, 2014 — Lindsey Konkel and Environmental Health News

Mothers' Lead Exposure Could Affect Newborns' Brains

Pregnant women exposed to lead had newborns who scored slightly lower on tests measuring reflexes and other skills tied to brain development, according to a new study from China

June 4, 2014 — Lindsey Konkel and Environmental Health News

Extreme Weather Stirs Up Forgotten Lead from Old Smelters

When a mile-wide tornado roared through Joplin, Mo., it killed 158 people and injured thousands, and it also kicked up toxic remnants from the city’s industrial past that are still haunting its residents on the third anniversary of the disaster...

May 21, 2014 — Brian Bienkowski and Environmental Health News

Soot and Smog Put China's Babies at Risk

China’s smoke-belching coal plants and heavy traffic may be signs of a bustling economy but health experts fear the country’s dirty air is hurting its infants

April 17, 2014 — Brian Bienkowski and Environmental Health News

Clean Air within Reach in U.S.--But Not for Long

Considered inconceivable just a decade ago, achieving the federal target for fine particulates is perhaps one of the nation’s greatest environmental success stories. But the victory will be short-lived...

March 6, 2014 — Brian Bienkowski and Environmental Health News

Are Men the Weaker Sex?

Contrary to cultural assumptions that boys are stronger and sturdier, basic biological weaknesses are built into the male of our species. These frailties leave them more vulnerable than girls to life’s hazards, including environmental pollutants such as insecticides, lead and plasticizers...

February 18, 2014 — Alice Shabecoff and Environmental Health News

New BPA Experiment Finds No Low-Dose Effects

Scientists at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have found that bisphenol A does not affect the health of rats fed low doses. Other scientists say the study is flawed

February 13, 2014 — Brian Bienkowski and Environmental Health News
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