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Stories by Felicity Muth

Chimpanzees React To A Robo-Doll

Chimpanzees React To A Robo-Doll

A large portion of what animals do is interact with each other. As a social species, we can hardly go an hour without some kind of interaction with another human, be it face-to-face or via text or email.

May 17, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Unique Science Communication: Isabella Rossellini

Unique Science Communication: Isabella Rossellini

I recently wrote an article about science communication, and in it mentioned that people can communicate science in many different ways using many different types of media.

May 16, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Bumblebees Are More Flexible Than We Knew

Bumblebees Are More Flexible Than We Knew

I recently wrote about how bumblebees were able to perform some seemingly impressive feats, although the underlying reason they could do so was relatively simple.

May 16, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Left-Eyed Fish Are Faster Learners

Left-Eyed Fish Are Faster Learners

You may have heard the claim that left-handed people are smarter than right handed people. Specifically, it seems that left-handed people are over represented in musicians, architects and art and music students.

May 16, 2014 — Felicity Muth
How To Get Into Science Communication Online

How To Get Into Science Communication Online

I recently taught a class on science journalism and science communication. Although there have been a few articles on this topic already (in particular I'd recommend reading Ed Yong's and Carl Zimmer's) I thought I'd share a bit of advice from my own experience.

May 11, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Forget The Flea Circus, Bees Can Do All The Tricks

Forget The Flea Circus, Bees Can Do All The Tricks

When we think of animals doing tricks, we’re likely to think of dogs               or maybe even a parrot                 But you probably didn’t think of bumblebees.

May 2, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Why Does This Lizard Have Such Fabulous Colours?

Why Does This Lizard Have Such Fabulous Colours?

Despite having the underwhelming name the `common wall lizard', this lizard sports some amazing colours on its underside. Although its back is a boring brown colour, presumably to be less visible to predators, the males have some fabulous colours on their bellies, as well as UV-blue patches down their sides (sadly not visible to us).

March 1, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Scientists Get Primates to Play Cards

Scientists Get Primates to Play Cards

A few months ago I moved to Reno, Nevada. Although I haven't been to a casino yet myself, living in a so-called `casino town' makes you acutely aware of the effects of gambling on people.

February 28, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Spiders are Disturbed by Human Noise

Spiders are Disturbed by Human Noise

Regardless what you might think of spiders, once you find out a bit about their behaviour it's hard to deny that they are at the very least, interesting animals.

February 25, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Best of Not Bad Science

Best of Not Bad Science

I recently realised that I had published 50 blog posts here at Scientific American Mind. When I first became interested in science writing as a PhD student a few years ago, I had no idea that I would end up having the privilege of writing for an online science magazine of such high calibre.

February 25, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Disproving Hollywood Stereotypes: The Bare Bones of Piranha Behaviour

Disproving Hollywood Stereotypes: The Bare Bones of Piranha Behaviour

Article by Amy Deacon   People eat fish, Grogan. Fish dont eat people reassures the camp leader in the film Piranha, shortly before a shoal of incredibly voracious fish turn the waters alongside the camp site red, in a savage attack on innocent bathers.

February 10, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Human Noise Disturbs Different Fish in Different Ways

Human Noise Disturbs Different Fish in Different Ways

It is well known that animals are affected by human noise pollution. For example, dark-eyed junco birds that live in cities sing both louder and with a different song than their countryside counterparts.

February 9, 2014 — Felicity Muth