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Stories by Judy Stone101 articles archived since 1845

Farewell to “Molecules to Medicine” on SciAm

As has been announced earlier today, Scientific American blogs is "being reorganized." As part of that euphemism, many blogs, mine included, are being eliminated as of today, along with changes in their editorial policies.

December 15, 2014 — Judy Stone
An Ethics Conference Where an Expert Gets it Wrong

An Ethics Conference Where an Expert Gets it Wrong

There was an interesting array of topics at last week's Advancing Ethical Research conference sponsored by Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIMR), ranging from basics of Institutional Review Boards (IRB) to ethics of Ebola trials, which was excellent.

December 15, 2014 — Judy Stone
Elegy for Rural Community Hospitals

Elegy for Rural Community Hospitals

In a pattern being repeated across the country, the Boothbay, Maine peninsula's hospital has been shuttered, and the communities just lost their bid to even have a 24 hour urgent care on the peninsula.

December 11, 2014 — Judy Stone
Ebola Quarantines: Can we stop the charade now?

Ebola Quarantines: Can we stop the charade now?

“I’m a believer in an abundance of caution but I’m not a believer of an abundance of idiocy.” Ashish Jha, MD Quarantine craziness has continued since my last post, with more states joining in the fray.

November 11, 2014 — Judy Stone

Quarantines: Chaos and Confusion

There has been a quantum change in the past few days as to how healthcare workers (HCW) returning from the West African countries of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone are being treated.

October 28, 2014 — Judy Stone
Superbugs should scare you more than Ebola in US

Superbugs should scare you more than Ebola in US

The first case of Ebola in the United States was announced today, with a patient in Dallas who traveled to the US from Liberia. The resultant hysteria and xenophobia prompts this reminder.

September 30, 2014 — Judy Stone
Ebola – the World’s Katrina

Ebola – the World’s Katrina

To anyone who follows infectious disease outbreaks, it is no great surprise that the most immediate, looming threat, Ebola, has received scant attention until recently.

September 9, 2014 — Judy Stone

Ebola and Priorities in Drug Development

News is rapidly changing regarding Ebola. Even as I've been writing this post, we've gone from "There is no treatment except supportive care" to NIH's Dr.

August 5, 2014 — Judy Stone
UMN: How many deaths have occurred during your clinical trials?

UMN: How many deaths have occurred during your clinical trials?

This series uses the story of Dan Markingson's participation in a clinical trial of anti-psychotic drugs at the University of Minnesota, his suicide in 2004 while participating on the study, and subsequent events as a case study in which to explore various aspects of clinical trial conduct.

May 8, 2014 — Judy Stone

Muddled about MERS? Here's A Quick Guide

While I was working on the “H1N-What?” post, I also knew there would soon be questions about MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), just as there were about SARS.

May 5, 2014 — Judy Stone

Need a Hand? Now You Can Print One

"Every 4 1/2 minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect." That translates to 1 of just 33 babies being born with a defect in the U.S. Of these, about 1,500 babies, or 4 out of every 10,000 babies are born missing a hand or arm ("upper limb reduction").

March 6, 2014 — Judy Stone
Have Pain? Are You Crazy? Rare Diseases Pt. 2

Have Pain? Are You Crazy? Rare Diseases Pt. 2

Its all in your head, patients with unexplained pain or unexpected symptoms often hear. My recent post on rare diseases and pediatric pain clearly resonated with a number of people, prompting my immersion in the medical literature and speaking with some experts and patients about these topics and about the difficulties patients with atypical symptoms [...]

February 18, 2014 — Judy Stone

H1N-What? Wading Through the Alphabet Soup of Flu Names

Muddled about all the new flu viruses? Its hard to keep up with the changing names in the news. H1Nwhat? Bird flu. Pig flu. MERS. SARS. Here is a quick overview of this dizzying, dyslexia inducing array, with what you need to worry about, even if some arent yet in your backyard.

January 30, 2014 — Judy Stone
Rare Diseases – in Honor of Sam Berns

Rare Diseases – in Honor of Sam Berns

Two cases this week highlight some of the difficulties surrounding rare and orphan diseases. First, Sam Berns, age 17, just died from his progressive genetic disease, progeria, which causes very rapid and premature aging.

January 14, 2014 — Judy Stone
What do you need to know to survive this years flu?

What do you need to know to survive this years flu?

I spent a year filtering spit and nasal washings, growing influenza in tissue cultures in a minimalist lab, and trying to develop an oral flu vaccine, all as part of my Infectious Diseases fellowship thirty years ago.

January 8, 2014 — Judy Stone

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