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Stories by S.E. Gould

Best Of Lab Rat 2011

Best Of Lab Rat 2011

This seems to be a fairly popular thing to do, and the New Year is as good a time as any to look back over my SciAm posts and see which ones I like, which ones I dislike, and how to make the posts better in the future...

January 1, 2012 — S.E. Gould

New Magnetic Bacteria!

I've mentioned magnetic bacteria a couple of times now, so I got quite excited when Lucas Brouwers alerted me to a recent paper in Science (ref below) that explored a whole new group of magnetic bacteria...

December 23, 2011 — S.E. Gould
Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 2

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 2

Second part of my thinly veiled excuse to research X-men and call it work. The first post can be found here. This is only meant to be a two-parter but I’ll see how I feel on Monday, and whether I can find any more X-men that are as amazing as bacteria...

December 16, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 2

Second part of my thinly veiled excuse to research X-men and call it work. The first post can be found here. This is only meant to be a two-parter but I'll see how I feel on Monday, and whether I can find any more X-men that are as amazing as bacteria...

December 16, 2011 — S.E. Gould
Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 1

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 1

This idea for a post has been kicking around in my head for a while now. As I’ve been finding blogging hard to get into recently, this should kick-start me back into it by letting me write about comics as well as science...

December 15, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 1

This idea for a post has been kicking around in my head for a while now. As I've been finding blogging hard to get into recently, this should kick-start me back into it by letting me write about comics as well as science...

December 15, 2011 — S.E. Gould

For all your blogging needs...

It's heading into the festive season, and unfortunately what with parties, Christmas, work, and trying to organise a honeymoon and then taking a honeymoon there will be something of a decrease in your regular Lab Rat blog posts over the next couple of months...

December 7, 2011 — S.E. Gould

A project for bioplastics - 10,000 bioplastic bottles

I while ago I wrote a quick piece exploring the use of algae to produce bacterial-based bioplastics. While this blog tends to focus more on the academic side of research, it's important to appreciate that in order to gain large-scale importance, research does at some point need to venture out of a purely academic environment and delve into the world of companies and industrial research.Ivan Goloborodko is one of a team of three people from Sydney currently looking into a more commercial and large-scale application of bioplastics; the production of bioplastic bottles...

November 30, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Bacteria that live on the Atkins Diet

Bacteria have adapted to live in many niches; from the environmental bacteria that live in the soil and the seas, to the highly specialised intracellular bacteria that rely exclusively on their surrounding host for nutrients...

November 23, 2011 — S.E. Gould

In another life ... I am a fiction writer

I've always thought of myself as a writer who likes science more than a scientist with a passing interest in writing. One of the reasons for this is that as well as writing science and microbiology related articles, I also dabble in fiction.Recently, I managed to not only finish one of my fiction stories, but actually have it accepted for E-publication...

November 20, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Bacteria with bodies - multicellular prokaryotes

Bacterial cells are fundamentally different to the cells of multicellular animals such as humans. They are far smaller, with less internal organisation and no nucleus (they have DNA but it is not packaged safely within a membrane)...

November 16, 2011 — S.E. Gould

How cancer-causing bacteria force your cells to die

The discovery that stomach ulcers are caused by bacteria is quite recent and was proved fairly conclusively in 1984 when the Australian scientist Barry Marshall drank a petri-dish full of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori and five days later developed serious gastritis, which cleared after antibiotic treatment...

November 13, 2011 — S.E. Gould

A farewell to Labwork …

Dear Labwork, We need to talk. I don’t think this will come as a surprise. I think you’ve noticed a difference in me, Labwork, and in my attitude towards you.

November 6, 2011 — S.E. Gould

How to explore a protein

I'm doing a journal club presentation tomorrow, where I take a paper apart in front of my lab through the medium of powerpoint. It's a nice short little paper but it does bring up some interesting points and also works as a prime example of a very common way that scientists go about exploring how a particular protein works...

November 2, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Modelling a werewolf epidemic

The field of bacteriology is a wide-reaching one. Blogging about bacteria means that I get to explore many different fields of science; from the highly molecular world of biochemistry and synthetic biology to the larger and more human-centred land of the pathologists and immunologists.One area that I don't go into so much is epidemiology; the study of how diseases spread through a population...

October 31, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Plastic from bacteria - now in algae!

Bacteria are capable of producing a wide range of exciting and important materials, and one of the most unusual is probably bacterial plastics. Used by the bacteria as an energy store, these bioplastics are of particular interest as not only could they be a non-oil-based form of plastic but they are also biodegradable...

October 26, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Microbe Hall of Fame

There are some beautiful new pictures on the New Scientist website of the top ten superbug supervillains. Each superbug has a mugshot along with a quick description of why it's so dangerous.Most of the bacterial names have "drug resistant" or "antibiotic resistant" now incorporated in front of the name...

October 22, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Global Handwashing Day - why you probably have poo on your phone.

Apparently yesterday was Global Handwashing Day! This is a day designed to encourage awareness of proper handwashing procedures and in the spirit of this I thought I'd take a look at a paper that came out recently about the amount of faecal matter found on mobile phones in the UK.Carried out by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine the report measured the bacterial load of people's hands and phones, including the amount of the faecal bacteria E...

October 16, 2011 — S.E. Gould
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Science or SciFi?

Science or SciFi?

Vanishing Particles. Spooky Action.