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Press Room

Kaigham J. Gabriel

Ken Gabriel is the President and CEO of The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., an independent not-for-profit research institution that develops innovative solutions to some of the nation’s most critical problems in national security, space, biomedical systems and energy.…read more

Ken Gabriel is the President and CEO of The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., an independent not-for-profit research institution that develops innovative solutions to some of the nation’s most critical problems in national security, space, biomedical systems and energy.

Ken was most recently the deputy director of the Advanced Technology and Projects (ATAP) group at Google, which he helped establish when he joined the organization in 2012 as Corporate Vice President at Google/Motorola Mobility. From 2009 to 2012, Ken was the Deputy Director, and then Acting Director, of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in the Department of Defense, an agency with an annual budget of $3B leading projects to both create and avoid technology surprise.

Widely regarded as the architect of the micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) industry, Gabriel was the Co-Founder, Chairman and Chief Technology Officer of Akustica, a fabless semiconductor company that commercialized MEMS audio devices and sensors between 2002 and 2009, the year it was acquired.

Ken has been a tenured professor in both the Robotics Institute and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He holds SM and ScD degrees in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Harold "Skip" Garner

Skip received his BS in Nuclear Engineering, a Ph.D. in plasma physics and holds an honorary professional engineering degree.…read more

Skip received his BS in Nuclear Engineering, a Ph.D. in plasma physics and holds an honorary professional engineering degree.

Skip worked for 12 years at General Atomics in La Jolla, California, where he conducted experimental and theoretical research at international fusion research facilities. He was a founding member of “The Institute”, an internal think tank.

From 1994 to 2009, at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Skip held the P. O’B. Montgomery, M.D., Distinguished Chair, was a Professor of Biochemistry and Internal Medicine. 

In 2009, Skip moved to Virginia Tech, where he is the Executive Director, office of Medical Informatics, Translation, Training and Ethics (MITTE), and a Professor of Medicine at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine.

In 2016, Skip also became a Professor of Biomedicine, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM), Executive Director, Primary Care Research Network and The Center for Bioinformatics and Genetics.  He is a Senior Research Member of the Gibbs Cancer Center.

He sits on numerous corporate advisory boards and advises for numerous governmental agencies. He is also the founder of several companies - Helix, BioAutomation, Light Biology (sold to Nimblegen, acquired by Roche), Orbit Genomics (previously Genomeon), Heliotext, Quanta Lingua and Comperity.

Michael Gazzaniga

Michael S. Gazzaniga is the Director of the Sage Center for the study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara.…read more

Michael S. Gazzaniga is the Director of the Sage Center for the study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received a Ph.D from the California Institute of Technology in 1964/65, where he worked with Roger Sperry, and had primary responsibility for initiating human split-brain research. He has carried out extensive studies on both sub-human primate and human behavior and cognition.  He has established Centers for Cognitive Neuroscience at Cornell Medical School and Dartmouth College and the Center for Neuroscience at UC, Davis. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience and also a founder of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society.  For 20 years he directed the Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience and serves as Editor-in-Chief of the major reference text, The Cognitive Neurosciences. He was a member of the President's Council on Bioethics from 2001-2009.  He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Science, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences.  

David Gross

David Gross is Chancellor's Chair Professor of Theoretical Physics and former Director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UCSB.…read more

David Gross is Chancellor's Chair Professor of Theoretical Physics and former Director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UCSB. He received his Ph.D. in 1966 at UC Berkeley and was previously Thomas Jones Professor of Mathematical Physics at Princeton University. He has been a central figure in particle physics and string theory. His discovery, with his student Frank Wilczek, of asymptotic freedom—the primary feature of non-Abelian gauge theories—led Gross and Wilczek to the formulation of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of the strong nuclear force. This completed the Standard Model, which details the three basic forces of particle physics--the electromagnetic force, the weak force, and the strong force. Gross was awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics, with Politzer and Wilczek, for this discovery. He has also made seminal contributions to the theory of Superstrings, a burgeoning enterprise that brings gravity into the quantum framework. His awards include the Sakurai Prize, MacArthur Prize, Dirac Medal, Oscar Klein Medal, Harvey Prize, the EPS Particle Physics Prize, the Grande Medaille d’Or and the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2004. He holds honorary degrees from the US, Britain, France, Israel, Argentina, Brazil, Belgium and China. His membership includes the US National Academy of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the Indian Academy of Science and the Chinese Academy of Science.

Lene Vestergaard Hau
Danny Hillis

Danny Hillis is an American inventor, entrepreneur, scientist, writer, and visionary who is particularly known for his work in computer science.…read more

Danny Hillis is an American inventor, entrepreneur, scientist, writer, and visionary who is particularly known for his work in computer science. He is best known as the founder of Thinking Machines, the pioneering parallel supercomputer manufacturer, and subsequently was a Fellow at Walt Disney Imagineering. More recently, Hillis cofounded Applied Minds, the technology R&D think-tank.

Currently, he is cofounder of Applied Invention, an interdisciplinary group of engineers, scientists, and artists that develops technology solutions in partnership with leading companies and entrepreneurs.

Hillis is Visiting Professor at the MIT Media Lab, Judge Widney Professor of Engineering and Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC), Professor of Research Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine, and Research Professor of Engineering at the Viterbi School of Engineering. He holds over 200 U.S. patents, and is the designer of a 10,000-year mechanical clock. Hillis is a Fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Daniel M. Kammen

Dr. Daniel M. Kammen is a Professor of Energy at the University of California, Berkeley, with parallel appointments in the Energy and Resources Group, the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the department of Nuclear Engineering.  He was appointed by then Secretary of State Hilary Clinton in April 2010 as the first energy fellow of the new Environment and Climate Partnership for the Americas (ECPA) initiative.  In 2016 he began service as the Science Envoy for U.…read more

Dr. Daniel M. Kammen is a Professor of Energy at the University of California, Berkeley, with parallel appointments in the Energy and Resources Group, the Goldman School of Public Policy, and the department of Nuclear Engineering.  He was appointed by then Secretary of State Hilary Clinton in April 2010 as the first energy fellow of the new Environment and Climate Partnership for the Americas (ECPA) initiative.  In 2016 he began service as the Science Envoy for U. S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Kammen is the founding director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory (RAEL; http://rael.berkeley.edu), and has served the State of California and US federal government in expert and advisory capacities, including time at the US Environmental Protection Agency, US Department of Energy, the Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Office of Science and Technology Policy

Dr. Kammen was educated in physics at Cornell (BA 1984) and Harvard (MA 1986; PhD 1988), and held postdoctoral positions at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard. He was an Assistant Professor and Chair of the Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University before moving to the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Kammen has served as a contributing or coordinating lead author on various reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change since 1999.  The IPCC shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

He has authored or co-authored 12 books, written more than 300 peer-reviewed journal publications, and has testified more than 40 times to U.S. state and federal congressional briefings. Kammen is a frequent contributor to or commentator in international news media, including Newsweek, Time, The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Financial Times. Kammen has appeared on ‘60 Minutes’ (twice), NOVA, Frontline, and hosted the six-part Discovery Channel series Ecopolis.  Dr. Kammen is a Permanent Fellow of the African Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, and the American Physical Society. In the US, has served on several National Academy of Sciences boards and panels.

Christof Koch

Christof Koch is an American neuroscientist best known for his studies and writings exploring the basis of consciousness.…read more

Christof Koch is an American neuroscientist best known for his studies and writings exploring the basis of consciousness. Trained as a physicist, Koch was for 27 years a professor of biology and engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He is now President and Chief Scientific Officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, leading a ten year, large-scale, high through-put effort to build brain observatories to map, analyze and understand the mouse and human cerebral cortex.

On a quest to understand the physical roots of consciousness before his brain stops functioning, he published his first paper on the neural correlates of consciousness with the molecular biologist Francis Crick a quarter of a century ago.

He is a frequent public speaker and writes a regular column for Scientific American Mind. Christof is a vegetarian who lives in Seattle and loves big dogs, climbing, rowing, and biking.

Morten L. Kringelbach

Professor Morten L Kringelbach is the director of the Hedonia research group based at the Universities of Oxford and Aarhus.…read more

Professor Morten L Kringelbach is the director of the Hedonia research group based at the Universities of Oxford and Aarhus. His prize-winning research seeks to understand the pleasure system (hedonia) in the human brain to find the best ways to increase well-being (eudaimonia). His research uses whole-brain computational models to understand the pleasure afforded by, for example, infants, music and flavour, and features regularly in newspapers, magazines, radio and television. He has a special interest in improving the public understanding of science and to link science with art; for example exploring “The Writer’s Brain” (with Dame AS Byatt) and creating sculptures such as “Pain/Pleasure” from brain data (with Annie Cattrell). He has written 14 books including “The Pleasure Center” and “Emotion. Pleasure and pain in the brain”. He is a fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford, of the Association for Psychological Science and a board member of the world’s first Empathy Museum.

Steven Kyle

Steven Kyle is an International Professor of Applied Economics and Management in the Cornell College of Business.  His main areas of interest are the macroeconomic issues that result from resource exports, particularly in low income countries.  He was born in the USA but grew up in various Latin American countries, acquiring an international experience and world view that led to this specialization in later life, though it is fair to say that his interests have remained quite broad through his career.  After graduating from high school in Mexico City he went to Swarthmore College, earning a BA in Economics.  At that point, immediately after the oil price shocks of the 1970's he worked at Brookhaven National Lab on energy systems modeling and optimization in the US and other countries.  After doing this for three years he went Harvard to earn his PhD in Economics with a dissertation focused on  the effects of developing country debt and macroeconomic policy on the value of commercial banks in the US and Europe.  After a two year stint in the World Bank Treasury working as a bond trader he went to Cornell University to work full time as a development economist and while pursuing his research and teaching at Cornell, has also had numerous consultancies with various governments, most recently with the Ministry of the Economy in Kazakhstan, leading a study on how best to regulate flows from oil revenue to the state budget.   However, as a citizen and resident of the USA he maintains a strong interest in the US economy and government policy toward the economy, particularly in the area of energy.…read more

Steven Kyle is an International Professor of Applied Economics and Management in the Cornell College of Business.  His main areas of interest are the macroeconomic issues that result from resource exports, particularly in low income countries.  He was born in the USA but grew up in various Latin American countries, acquiring an international experience and world view that led to this specialization in later life, though it is fair to say that his interests have remained quite broad through his career.  After graduating from high school in Mexico City he went to Swarthmore College, earning a BA in Economics.  At that point, immediately after the oil price shocks of the 1970's he worked at Brookhaven National Lab on energy systems modeling and optimization in the US and other countries.  After doing this for three years he went Harvard to earn his PhD in Economics with a dissertation focused on  the effects of developing country debt and macroeconomic policy on the value of commercial banks in the US and Europe.  After a two year stint in the World Bank Treasury working as a bond trader he went to Cornell University to work full time as a development economist and while pursuing his research and teaching at Cornell, has also had numerous consultancies with various governments, most recently with the Ministry of the Economy in Kazakhstan, leading a study on how best to regulate flows from oil revenue to the state budget.   However, as a citizen and resident of the USA he maintains a strong interest in the US economy and government policy toward the economy, particularly in the area of energy.

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