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Special Report

The Hobbit: 10 Years Later

In October 2004 paleontologists announced a new human species called Homo floresiensis. Ever since then debate has raged on whether it truly is a new species or merely a diseased Homo sapiens

Ancient Bird Remains Illuminate Lost World of Indonesia s Hobbits

The giant marabou stork found at Liang Bua is an extinct relative of the modern marabou stork from Africa shown here. Credit: Lip Kee/Flickr via Creative Commons license LAS VEGAS--A study of bird remains from the same cave that yielded bones of a mini human species called Homo floresiensis and nicknamed the hobbit has cast new light on the lost world of this enigmatic human relative.

November 6, 2011 — Kate Wong

What the small-brained hobbit reveals about primate evolution

Is bigger always better? When it comes to brain size, that has long been the prevailing theory—at least among big-brained humans. But a new analysis shows that in the course of primate evolution, brains and brawn haven't always been on the rise.

January 26, 2010 — Katherine Harmon

Hobbit Hullabaloo

New findings challenge the idea of a mini human species on Flores

June 1, 2008 — Kate Wong
Hobbit Hubbub

Hobbit Hubbub

New study stirs debate over mini human species

August 22, 2006 — Kate Wong
Digging Deeper: Q&A with Peter Brown

Digging Deeper: Q&A with Peter Brown

A discoverer of an extinct dwarf species of human reflects on one of the most startling paleoanthropological revelations in living memory

October 27, 2004 — Kate Wong
A <i>Nature Special</i>: The Hobbit at 10

A Nature Special: The Hobbit at 10

The remains of the tiny hominin Homo floresiensis still raise supersize questions 10 years after the publication in Nature of their discovery. This special Nature collection of more than two dozen articles and research papers examines the controversy surrounding the origins of this species

Little Brains, Big Brains: Latest Flores Hobbit News and the Intel Science Fair

Kate Wong brings us up to date on the ongoing research into fossils of the tiny human, called the Hobbit, found on the island of Flores. And Ivan Oransky reports from the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Plus, Nobel laureate Gerald Edelman illustrates problems with reductionism and refrigerators. And we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Web sites mentioned on this episode include www.SciAm.com/daily, www.nybg.org/darwin/symposium.php, www.intel.com/education/ISEF

May 21, 2008 — Steve Mirsky
The Hobbit: 10 Years Later

In October 2004 paleontologists announced a new human species called Homo floresiensis. Ever since then debate has raged on whether it truly is a new species or merely a diseased Homo sapiens

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