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Math907 articles archived since 1845

The Race to Replace the Kilogram

The long-running effort to ditch the decaying, 19th-century artifact that defines the kilogram nears its conclusion

February 1, 2017 — Tim Folger

Knot Not Easy to Knot

Chemists have synthesized the most complex molecular knot ever, using a strand just 192 atoms long. The advance could lead to new tougher materials. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 18, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

How to Quickly Calculate Percentages

How to calculate percentages is easier than you think. Quick, what’s 36% of 25? Or how about 250% of 20? Learn a quick and dirty tip to help you calculate all of those pesky percentages in your head.

January 11, 2017 — Math Dude Jason Marshall

Best Science Books of 2016

Barbara Kiser, books and arts editor at Nature, talks about her favorite science books of 2016, especially three works about the little-known history of women mathematicians. 

December 31, 2016 — Barbara Kiser and Steve Mirsky

Mesmerizing Fractals

An artistic science project from Science Buddies

December 22, 2016 — Science Buddies and Sabine de Brabandere

What Is a Light-Year?

Do you know what it is that a light-year actually measures? Do you know why so many people find it confusing? And why they really shouldn’t?

December 3, 2016 — Math Dude Jason Marshall

The Math behind the Polls

When polls try to tease out what a group of people is thinking, what are they measuring and how can they go wrong?

November 29, 2016 — Lydia Chain
How to Use Statistics to Understand Poll Results

How to Use Statistics to Understand Poll Results

Learn how to use statistics to understand the significance of the latest political polling results and to keep yourself from being duped by misleading information

October 26, 2016 — Math Dude Jason Marshall

Solving the Rubik's Equation

Author and “Speedcuber” Ian Scheffler reveals some of the math behind how you could solve the Rubik’s cube puzzle.

October 24, 2016 — Lydia Chain

The Mathematics of Cake Cutting

Computer scientists have come up with an algorithm that can fairly divide a cake among any number of people

October 13, 2016 — Erica Klarreich and Quanta Magazine

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