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Special Report

The 2014 Nobel Prizes

The brain's inner GPS, blue LEDs and a super-high resolution microscopy technique were the discoveries that took the prestigious honors this year

Blue Chip

Shuji Nakamura beat the titans to blue LEDs and lasers, potentially revolutionizing lighting and data storage

July 5, 2000 — Glenn Zorpette
Building a Better Microscope: 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Building a Better Microscope: 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry is awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. The winning work is explained by chemistry Nobel Committee members Sven Lidin and Måns Ehrenberg

 

October 8, 2014 — Steve Mirsky
2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner share the 2014 chemistry Nobel for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy, which has enabled the study of single molecules in ongoing chemical reactions in living cells. Steve Mirsky reports

 

October 8, 2014 — Steve Mirsky
Blue Light Special: 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics

Blue Light Special: 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura for the invention of efficient blue light–emitting diodes, which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources. The winning work is explained by physics Nobel Committee members Per Delsing and Olle Inganäs

 

October 7, 2014 — Steve Mirsky
2014 Nobel Prize in Physics

2014 Nobel Prize in Physics

Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura share the physics Nobel for the invention of efficient blue light–emitting diodes, which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources. Steve Mirsky reports

 

October 7, 2014 — Steve Mirsky
2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser share the prize for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain. Steve Mirsky reports

 

October 6, 2014 — Steve Mirsky
The Map in Your Mind: 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

The Map in Your Mind: 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain—an inner GPS. The winning work is explained by Karolinska Institute faculty and Nobel Committee members Göran Hansson, Ole Kiehn, Hans Forssberg and Juleen Zierath
 

October 6, 2014 — Steve Mirsky
The 2014 Nobel Prizes

The brain's inner GPS, blue LEDs and a super-high resolution microscopy technique were the discoveries that took the prestigious honors this year

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