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Stories by Dan Schlenoff

A Year of War, 1915

A year into the Great War there was an interesting difference between the accuracy of reporting in some articles and the haze of obscurity drawn by the military censors over still-volatile events...

August 7, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Desperately Seeking Anti-Submarine Weapons, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: July 24, 1915 The British Royal Navy commanded the sea during World War I; had it not, Britain and France would not have been able to feed and arm themselves with imported food, raw materials and weapons...

July 24, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

The Armored Tortoise Fails, 1915

Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: July 17, 1915 By July 1915 World War I had been raging for almost a year. Nearly two million soldiers had died and another four million had been wounded...

July 17, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Battleship Optimism Ignores Reality, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: July 10, 1915 An article in the July 10, 1915 issue of Scientific American carried an article about plans for a new French battleship, the Tourville (and by extension the sister ships in the class: Duquesne, Lyon and Lille )...

July 10, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Fighting Zeppelins with Airplanes, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: June 26, 1915 After the First World War broke out, airships quickly became a scourge.

June 26, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Italy Is Bribed into War, 1915

Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: June 19, 1915 Italy declared war on Austria-Hungary on May 23, 1915. The great hope of the Allies was that an army of more than a million men would be thrown against the Austro-Hungarian troops guarding their southern flank at the northeast corner of Italy...

June 19, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Defense against Poison Gas, 1915

Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: June 12, 1915 Germany (taking a cue from France) first used poison gas on a large scale against Allied troops manning trenches near Ypres, Belgium, on April 22, 1915...

June 12, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

War and Automobile Advertising, 1915

Printed in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: June 5, 1915 Early in World War I violence came to the serene island of Tahiti in the Pacific when two German armored warships attacked Papeete, the capital of what is now called French Polynesia...

June 5, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

The Teeth of the Submarine, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: May 29, 1915 Some of the articles on military subjects in Scientific American lack specific details, pointing to a decision made somewhere to curtail the journalist’s access to the people in the know or places or things of military importance...

May 29, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

A War of Poison Gas, 1915

Reported in  Scientific American , This Week in World War I: May 15, 1915 As the Great War ground down to a deadlock, both sides sought some method of gaining an advantage.

May 15, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Battle of Gallipoli: A Strategic View, 1915

Battle of Gallipoli: A Strategic View, 1915

Scientific American looked at the wider context of the battle for Gallipoli. This Week in World War I: April 24, 1915 April 25, 2015, marks the 100-year anniversary of an important battle in the First World War: it was a major defeat for the Allies (Britain, France and Russia) and a great victory for the [...]..

April 24, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Rescuing the Drowning Submarine, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 10, 1915 The United States submarine F-4 was launched in January 1912, and foundered in March 1915 near Honolulu in 300 feet of water, with the loss of all 21 crew...

April 10, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Proud Battleships, Subtle Mines: Dardanelles, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: April 3, 1915 "The day when Constantinople will be covered by the guns of the enemy is not very far distant." That's the ebulliant sentence from the article in Scientific American two weeks before this one, just after the initial British and French attack near [...]..

April 3, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

The Zeppelin Earns a Fearsome Reputation, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 27, 1915 Airships with rigid frames were developed by Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin of Germany starting in the late 19th century...

March 27, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
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