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Stories by Dan Schlenoff

Naval Attack on the Dardanelles: Prelude to a Disaster, 1915

Naval Attack on the Dardanelles: Prelude to a Disaster, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 20, 1915 The report published in this issue from a century ago delivers a robustly optimistic outlook on the Allied attack on Turkish territory at the entrance to the waterway between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean: "If the great Mahan were living to-day [...]..

March 20, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Magnets of Mercy Treat War Injuries, 1915

Magnets of Mercy Treat War Injuries, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 13, 1915 In a war that was defined by the mass production of war supplies, the great manufacturing center of Pittsburgh, Pa., was already an important source of matériel for all the armies involved: "Pittsburgh's great industrial plants are furnishing practically all the barbed [...]..

March 13, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

The Big Guns, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: March 6, 1915 World War I was an artillery war. Even as new technology—tanks, airplanes, submarines and poison gas—changed the nature of fighting, it was the power of mass manufacturing that had the most profound effect on the conduct of war...

March 6, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
American Fear, 1915

American Fear, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: February 27, 1915 The size, speed and ferocity of the Great War was unprecedented.

February 27, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Airborne Scouts, 1915

Airborne Scouts, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: February 20, 1915 The usefulness of scouting from the air had been demonstrated in the early days of the Great War.

February 20, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Air Defenses against Zeppelins, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: February 13, 1915 German Zeppelins (airships with rigid frames) bombed Liège, Belgium, on August 6, 1914, only a few days after the Great War broke out...

February 13, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

X-Rays at War, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 30, 1915 X-rays were used for medical operations within a couple of months after they were discovered by Wilhelm Roentgen in late 1895...

January 30, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
X-Rays at War, 1915

X-Rays at War, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 30, 1915 X-rays were used for medical operations within a couple of months after they were discovered by Wilhelm Roentgen in late 1895...

January 30, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
Fortress of Water, 1915

Fortress of Water, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 23, 1915 The cover of this issue of the magazine has a boisterous scene from the opening months of the First World War, titled "Night attack by German armored motor boats in a flooded section of Flanders." There is no story inside relating to [...]..

January 23, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Extreme Submarine, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 16, 1915 Before the First World War, Simon Lake designed and built some innovative submarines for the U.S.

January 16, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part III)

An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part III)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 9, 1915 In this issue of Scientific American from 1915, we published the last installment of a three-part account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: A Battle in the Clouds," by Frederick C...

January 9, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part II)

An American Pilot at War, 1915 (Part II)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: January 2, 1915 In this issue of Scientific American from 1915, we published the second installment of a three-part first-hand account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: Patrol of the Sky" by Frederick C...

January 2, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

An American Pilot at War, 1914 (Part I)

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 26, 1914 In this issue of Scientific American from 1914, we published the first installment of a three-part first-hand account: "War Experiences of an Air Scout: The Diary of an American Volunteer With the Aviation Corps of the French Army," by Frederick C...

December 26, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

Ramming a Submarine, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 19, 1914 Scientific American in 1914 sometimes used large, single-theme images for the issue cover.

December 19, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

First Airplane Flight Marks 111th Anniversary!

It was 111 years ago today that the world's first piloted, powered, controllable, heavier-than-air machine built and flown by Orville and Wilbur Wright took to the air.

December 17, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
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Science or SciFi?

Science or SciFi?

Vanishing Particles. Spooky Action.