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Stories by Karen Hopkin

Monogamy May Be Written in Our Genes

In animal studies, a set of 24 genes involved in neural development, learning and memory, and cognition, seem to be associated with monogamy. Karen Hopkin reports.

January 11, 2019 — Karen Hopkin

Survey the Wildlife of the "Great Indoors"

Biologists are enlisting citizen scientists to poke around under the sink and behind the curtains, for wildlife living in the "great indoors." Karen Hopkin reports.

September 10, 2018 — Karen Hopkin

Pasta Problem Cracked!

An intrepid undergrad led the way to understanding the physics of snapping strands of spaghetti.

September 4, 2018 — Karen Hopkin

A Litmus Test for Bad Breath

Researchers engineered a portable device that detects even the tiniest trace of hydrogen sulfide—one of the primary offenders in bad breath. Karen Hopkin reports. 

June 13, 2018 — Karen Hopkin

U.S. Flu Spread Counts On Southern Cold Snaps

A multifactorial analysis finds that the ignition of a flu epidemic stems from a blast of colder weather striking an otherwise warm, humid, urban environment, and driving people indoors into close quarters.  

March 21, 2018 — Karen Hopkin

Some Lichen Fungi Let Genes Go Bye

A study of 22 different types of lichens revealed 10 included fungi that had lost a gene for energy production, making them completely dependent on their algal partner.  

March 1, 2018 — Karen Hopkin

Mosquitoes Learn the Smell of Danger

The bloodsuckers lose their appetite for attractive scents when they associate those aromas with a likelihood of being swatted. Karen Hopkin reports.

February 22, 2018 — Karen Hopkin

Limited Time Offer: Scientific American Health & Medicine Premiere Issue

Limited Time Offer: Scientific American Health & Medicine Premiere Issue