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Stories by Karen Hopkin

Highway Sounds Might Mask Life-Saving Birdcalls

The call of the tufted titmouse conveys important information about the presence of potential predators. But only if other birds can hear it. Karen Hopkin reports.

June 30, 2016 — Karen Hopkin

Made Ya Look, Monkey

Over their lifetimes, macaques follow the same trajectory as humans in the amount of interest they have in observing what another individual is looking at.  

June 28, 2016 — Karen Hopkin

Lizard Stripes May Mess Up Predators' Timing

A lizard's stripes may make them look like they’re moving slower than they really are, confusing predators that tend to aim at the head but may wind up with the tail.    

June 20, 2016 — Karen Hopkin

Shy Fish Prefer to Follow Other Shy Fish

Shy sticklebacks were more likely to emerge from under cover when an equally wary fellow was already out there, rather than when a bold individual was present. 

June 3, 2016 — Karen Hopkin

Male Lemurs Are Masters of Musk

Lemurs sometimes mix their smelly secretions to produce a bouquet of stank—which may boost the perfume’s staying power. Karen Hopkin reports.

May 4, 2016 — Karen Hopkin

Bear Gut Microbes Help Prep Hibernation

Bears’ gut summer bacteria are more diverse and include species that tend to promote energy storage than are the bacteria that live in them during their hibernation. 

February 4, 2016 — Karen Hopkin

Better Road Signs Could Save Bicycle Riders

Signs that say "Share the Road" with bicycles may have far less influence over motor vehicle driver behavior than would signs saying "Bicycles May Use Full Lane."  

September 4, 2015 — Karen Hopkin