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Stories by Katie Moisse

Back in style: An ancient shoe from 3500 B.C. looks like moccasins worn in the 1950s

Talk about vintage footwear—an international team of archaeologists has discovered the world's oldest leather shoe. One thousand years older than the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt, the 5,500-year-old shoe was perfectly preserved by the cool, dry conditions in the sheep dung–lined cave in Armenia where it was found."We thought initially that the shoe and other objects were about 600 to 700 years old because they were in such good condition," Ron Pinhasi said in a prepared statement.

June 9, 2010 — Katie Moisse

The 2010 Kavli Prizes honors eight scientists in astrophysics, nanotech and neuroscience

Eight scientists will share three million-dollar Kavli Prizes for their contributions in the fields of astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience. The announcement was made today in Oslo, Norway, by Nils Christian Stenseth, president of the Nor­wegian Academy of Science and Letters, and broadcast live at the opening of the World Science Festival in New York City.

June 3, 2010 — Katie Moisse

Working overtime: Good for the wallet, but bad for the heart

Working overtime increases your risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a report published May 12 in the European Heart Journal .

Using data from a study called Whitehall II, which followed 6,014 British civil servants for an average of 11 years between 1991 and 2004, researchers examined the risk of CHD in people who did not work overtime compared to their workaholic office-mates.

May 11, 2010 — Katie Moisse

Almost winning is just as exciting for problem gamblers

Oh, so close. Just one more try.

It's hard to understand what keeps problem gamblers betting after a long losing streak. But a new study published May 5 in The Journal of Neuroscience suggests their brains' reward centers, part of the dopamine system (so-called because the neurons release the neurotransmitter dopamine), react the same way to a "near miss" as they would to a win.

May 5, 2010 — Katie Moisse

Good teachers really do make a difference

Twin studies have shown that genetic factors can account for as much as 82 percent of the variability in children's reading skills. But while genes might set the bar for reading potential, a new study published April 23 in Science shows that teachers play a leading role in helping kids reach it.

April 22, 2010 — Katie Moisse
Does Stress Feed Cancer?

Does Stress Feed Cancer?

A new study shows stress hormones make it easier for malignant tumors to grow and spread

April 13, 2010 — Katie Moisse