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Special Report

The Titanic: 100 Years Later

A look back at one of the biggest moments in steamship history, including how Scientific American covered it

The Science behind the Iceberg that sank the Titanic

The Science behind the Iceberg that sank the Titanic

The tragedy of the "unsinkable" Titanic - lost in the cold water of the Atlantic - became part of history and pop culture, but the story of the main culprit that caused the disaster is mostly forgotten and only vague descriptions and some photos exists of the supposed iceberg(s).

April 14, 2012 — David Bressan
How did Titanic really break up?

How did Titanic really break up?

Hello, everyone!I'm a member of the Marine Forensics Committee, and author or co-author of three peer-reviewed papers on the “Titanic”. My most recent paper, “The Breakup Of Titanic – A Re-Examination of Survivor Accounts”, was presented at the First International Marine Forensics Symposium on April 4.Working with Roy Mengot (with whom I co-authored one paper), I've been gathering evidence to support a reconstruction of the breakup of the “Titanic” that differs somewhat from the one you may have seen in movies or in other publications.

April 9, 2012 — Richard Woytowich
New Images of <i>Titanic</i> Wreck Revealed

New Images of Titanic Wreck Revealed

Sweeping images of the sunken ship were made by stitching together hundreds of optical and sonar images collected by deep-diving robots during a 2010 expedition

March 30, 2012 — OurAmazingPlanet

Titanic: Resonance and Reality

A century ago a great ship struck an iceberg and sank, earning a permanent place among the stories we tell—and lessons we should learn

April 4, 2012 — Daniel C. Schlenoff
The Titanic: 100 Years Later

A look back at one of the biggest moments in steamship history, including how Scientific American covered it

Scientific American Space & Physics