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Stories by Dan Schlenoff

The Serious Work of Balloons, 1916

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: February 12, 1916. The cover of the February 12, 1916, issue of Scientific American has an image of a military balloon: “Hauling a French observation balloon to a new signalling post.” The balloon in question is a Parseval-Sigsfeld kite balloon, first introduced in Germany in 1896, but used by all armies involved in the First World War...

February 12, 2016 — Dan Schlenoff

Industry and Guns, 1916

Reported in Scientific American , this Week in World War I: February 5, 1916. As World War One progressed, military forces desperately needed heavier and heavier guns: naval guns for arming the largest “superdreadnought” battleships; railway guns brought in to bombard distant targets with huge shells; siege artillery for smashing the hardest targets...

February 5, 2016 — Dan Schlenoff

Horse Doctors, 1916

Reported in Scientific American , This Week in World War I: January 29, 1916. Horses were a vital necessity for all armies in World War 1. Their use as cavalry or mounted infantry was limited, mostly to the Middle East and occasionally on the Eastern Front in Russia...

January 29, 2016 — Dan Schlenoff

Unrestricted Submarine Warfare, 1916

Reported in Scientific American , this Week in World War I: January 15, 1916. The image on the cover of the January 15, 1916, issue of Scientific American  (below) is full of violent drama: a huge steamship sinking, as boatloads of desperate survivors try to pull away from the burning wreck...

January 15, 2016 — Dan Schlenoff

Naval Aviation, 1916

Reported in Scientific American, this Week in World War I: January 8, 1916. At the outbreak of World War I the airplane was only 11 years old. Its first and most useful military task was as “eyes in the sky,” unmasking enemy troop movements...

January 8, 2016 — Dan Schlenoff

The News on Steel Helmets, 1916

Reported in Scientific American , this Week in World War I: January 1, 1916 As 1916 opened, there was some rare positive news from the war in Europe (although it should be noted that bad news rarely came through the military censors intact)...

January 1, 2016 — Dan Schlenoff

Flying Battleship, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, this Week in World War I: December 25, 1915

December 25, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Cloak of Invisibility, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, this Week in World War I: December 18, 1915 The word “camouflage” entered the English language, from the French, in 1917.

December 18, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff
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Dwindling Supply. Increasing Demand.

Dwindling Supply. Increasing Demand.

Solving the Water Crisis