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The Flea

The Flea

Image of the Week #102, July 31st, 2013: From: How the Fleas’ Next of Kin Ended up Living on a Liverwort in Alaska by Jennifer Frazer at The Artful Amoeba.

July 31, 2013 — Bora Zivkovic
The Austere Beauty of Other Worlds

The Austere Beauty of Other Worlds

In the northern winter months we are surrounded by the stark beauty of chilled landscapes. From the darkness of the far north, broken perhaps only by starlight and the glow of aurora, to the brisk grey streets of Manhattan and its now skeletal trees with their claw-like limbs and knobbly stubs pressed to the skies, [...]..

December 30, 2011 — Caleb A. Scharf
The Physics of Fred Flintstone's Flaming Feet

The Physics of Fred Flintstone's Flaming Feet

I hope that the father of the "modern Stone Age family" has thick skin, or else he is going to lose his legs. Let's put aside the fact that Fred Flintstone basically runs to work and therefore doesn't really need his wheels (or that he would need the quads of a god to get them [...]..

April 22, 2013 — Kyle Hill
The Animals Hiding in a T. Rex's Roar

The Animals Hiding in a T. Rex's Roar

Instead of producing the terror you may suspect, cinema's most famous roar would probably just confuse a lot of animals. If you made it to the recently re-released 3D edition of Jurassic Park, you're going to hear a dreadful sound that terrified audiences two decades ago...

April 10, 2013 — Kyle Hill
Compound Eye: the many facets of science photography

Compound Eye: the many facets of science photography

Welcome to Compound Eye, a Scientific American photography blog! The blog is new, but the blogger is not. My name is Alex Wild. I am an entomologist and nature photographer based in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, and I have been writing about insects, science, and photography at Myrmecos Blog since 2007...

July 5, 2011 — Alex Wild
A High School Lab As Engaging as Facebook

A High School Lab As Engaging as Facebook

Just down the hall from Paulo Blikstein's office at Stanford University is a student laboratory of the future. It has spring green-and-yellow tiled floors, matching walls and is stocked with every type of digital fabrication tool one can imagine: laser cutters, 3D printers, 3D scanners, 3D milling machines, robotics, and programming tools...

November 29, 2013 — Anna Kuchment
Teenager creates new flu drugs

Teenager creates new flu drugs

Last month, 17-year-old Eric Chen from San Diego, California became the third Grand Prize winner in Google Science Fair history. Judges awarded him $50,000, a 10-day trip to the Galapagos Islands, a year of mentoring, and other prizes...

October 21, 2013 — Anna Kuchment
Hold the Elevator: How Otis's Early Systems Worked

Hold the Elevator: How Otis's Early Systems Worked

2013 marks 160 years since Elisha Graves Otis sold his first elevator, designed specifically for safety. Sales languished, though, until he attended the 1854 world's fair in New York City and, at the Crystal Palace, demonstrated the innovation that made elevators stop, instead of falling, if their cables snapped...

April 12, 2013 — Ricki Rusting

Möbius Music Box Score

Keeping with the Oscars theme, if the previously-posted World Science Festival video was a bit too long for a Sunday evening, Vi Hart has a short and sweet video of a (one-sided) Möbius strip on which she has rigged to play a musical theme from Harry Potter...

March 2, 2014 — Princess Ojiaku
Technology Revitalizes Hands-On Education in Classrooms

Technology Revitalizes Hands-On Education in Classrooms

Technology has abstracted the educational sphere in the way it has abstracted all other aspects of our lives. Pencils and paper have given way to the more amorphous cloud-based computing, kids are presenting more with Prezi than on poster boards, and work can be turned in online instead of in-hand...

November 7, 2014 — Jody Passanisi and Shara Peters

Marine Archaeology Goes High-Tech

Editor's Note: Veteran science journalist Philip Hilts is working and diving with a team of archeologists, engineers and divers off the shore of Antikythera, a remote Greek island, where a treasure ship by the same name sank in 70 B.C...

September 29, 2014 — Philip J. Hilts
Antwerp, 1914: New Technology, Civilian Targets

Antwerp, 1914: New Technology, Civilian Targets

Reported in Scientific American—This Week in World War I: September 19, 1914 The Belgian field army retreated into the fortified city of Antwerp only 16 days after the Germans had invaded...

September 26, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
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Science or SciFi?

Science or SciFi?

Vanishing Particles. Spooky Action.