Skip to main content

Stories by Christopher Intagliata

Species Split When Mountains Rise

Plant species in China's Hengduan Mountains exploded in diversity eight million years ago—right when the mountains were built. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

April 13, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Cave Dwellers Battled Bed Bug Bites, Too

Researchers have found the earliest evidence of bugs in the Cimex genus co-habitating with humans, in Oregon's Paisley Caves. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

April 6, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

UV Rays Strip Small Galaxies of Star Stuff

Researchers measured the intensity of the universe's ultraviolet background radiation, and say it may be strong enough to strip small galaxies of star-forming gas. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 22, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Pollinators Shape Plants to Their Preference

In fewer than a dozen generations bumblebee-pollinated plants were coaxed to develop traits that made them even more pleasing to the bees. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 16, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Low Biodiversity Brings Earlier Bloom

For every two species lost in a grassland, the remaining flowers there bloomed a day earlier—on par with changes due to rising global temperatures. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 15, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

(Probably Not a) Giant Alien Antenna

Astrophysicists propose that mysterious "fast radio bursts" could, in very speculative theory, be produced by an antenna twice the size of Earth. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 12, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Teeth Hint at a Friendlier Neandertal

By sequencing DNA in Neandertal dental plaque, scientists were able to find out about their diets—and their good relations with modern humans. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 8, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Biggest Rivers Are Overhead

Atmospheric rivers can carry the same amount of water vapor as 15 to 20 Mississippi Rivers—and deliver punishing winds, too. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

March 3, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Last Woollies Had Mammoth Mutations

The final holdout woolly mammoths had large numbers of harmful mutations—which would have given them satiny coats and a weakened sense of smell. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 2, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Blood Cells Remember Your Mountain Vacation

Red blood cells retain a memory of high-altitude exposure, allowing for faster acclimation next time. But that memory fades within four months. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

February 23, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Heat Sensor Has Snaky Sensitivity

Researchers have developed a heat sensor that can detect temperature changes of just ten thousandths of a degree Celsius—comparable with the sensitivity of pit vipers. Christopher Intagliata reports.

February 15, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Cool Coating Chills in Sunlight

A thin film coating can chill a vat of water to 15 degress Fahrenheit cooler than its surroundings, by absorbing—and then emitting—the sun's infrared rays. Christopher Intagliata reports.

February 13, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Frog Spit Behaves Like Bug-Catching Ketchup

The amphibians' saliva is what's known as a "shear-thinning fluid," like ketchup—sometimes thick, sometimes thin and flowing. Christopher Intagliata reports.

February 6, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

LSD's Long, Strange Trip Explained

When LSD binds to serotonin receptors, it pulls a "lid" closed behind it, locking it in place for hours, and explaining its long-lasting effects. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

January 26, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Pesticide Additive Could Be One Culprit in Bee Deaths

A common pesticide additive, known as an "inert" ingredient, could be one of the causes of the die-offs beekeepers have observed in their hives. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 21, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Knot Not Easy to Knot

Chemists have synthesized the most complex molecular knot ever, using a strand just 192 atoms long. The advance could lead to new tougher materials. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 18, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata