Skip to main content

Stories by Christopher Intagliata

New Concrete Recipes Could Cut Cracks

Recipes for concrete that incorporate by-products from the coal and steel industries, like fly ash and slag, could reduce road salt–related cracking. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

May 19, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Bees Prefer Flowers That Proffer Nicotine

Bumblebees sought out flowers with nicotine in their nectar, and the drug appeared to enhance the bees' memories. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

May 17, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

The Sneaky Danger of Space Dust

When tiny particles of space debris slam into satellites, the collision could cause the emission of hardware-frying radiation. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

May 11, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Insects Donate DNA to Unrelated Bugs

Bacteria swap DNA among themselves. And that process may be more common in multicellular organisms than previously believed. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

May 10, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Gut Microbes Help Keep Starved Flies Fecund

Microbes living in the guts of fruit flies appear to influence the flies' food choice—and promote egg production, even under a nutrient-poor diet. Christopher Intagliata reports.

April 26, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Species Split When Mountains Rise

Plant species in China's Hengduan Mountains exploded in diversity eight million years ago—right when the mountains were built. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

April 13, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Cave Dwellers Battled Bed Bug Bites, Too

Researchers have found the earliest evidence of bugs in the Cimex genus co-habitating with humans, in Oregon's Paisley Caves. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

April 6, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

UV Rays Strip Small Galaxies of Star Stuff

Researchers measured the intensity of the universe's ultraviolet background radiation, and say it may be strong enough to strip small galaxies of star-forming gas. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 22, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Pollinators Shape Plants to Their Preference

In fewer than a dozen generations bumblebee-pollinated plants were coaxed to develop traits that made them even more pleasing to the bees. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 16, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Low Biodiversity Brings Earlier Bloom

For every two species lost in a grassland, the remaining flowers there bloomed a day earlier—on par with changes due to rising global temperatures. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 15, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

(Probably Not a) Giant Alien Antenna

Astrophysicists propose that mysterious "fast radio bursts" could, in very speculative theory, be produced by an antenna twice the size of Earth. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 12, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Teeth Hint at a Friendlier Neandertal

By sequencing DNA in Neandertal dental plaque, scientists were able to find out about their diets—and their good relations with modern humans. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 8, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Biggest Rivers Are Overhead

Atmospheric rivers can carry the same amount of water vapor as 15 to 20 Mississippi Rivers—and deliver punishing winds, too. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

March 3, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Last Woollies Had Mammoth Mutations

The final holdout woolly mammoths had large numbers of harmful mutations—which would have given them satiny coats and a weakened sense of smell. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 2, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Blood Cells Remember Your Mountain Vacation

Red blood cells retain a memory of high-altitude exposure, allowing for faster acclimation next time. But that memory fades within four months. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

February 23, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

NEW eBook!

Get the latest on Alzheimer’s and more