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Stories by Christopher Intagliata

Bots Outperform Humans if They Impersonate Us

Bots masquerading as humans in a game outperformed their human opponents—but the their superiority vanished when their machine identity was revealed. Christopher Intagliata reports. ...

November 21, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Dogs Like Motion That Matches Sound

Pet dogs appeared more interested in videos of a bouncing ball when the motion of the ball matched a rising and falling tone. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

November 19, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Aversion to Broccoli May Have Genetic Roots

Study subjects with a gene variant that heightened their sensitivity to bitterness tended to eat fewer vegetables than people who didn’t mind bitter flavors. Christopher Intagliata reports...

November 12, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Familiar Tunes Rapidly Jog the Brain

Within just a third of a second of hearing a snippet of a familiar refrain, our pupils dilate, and the brain shows signs of recognition. Christopher Intagliata reports.

November 5, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

We Owe Our Pumpkins to Pooping Megafauna

The pumpkin’s ancestor was an incredibly bitter, tennis-ball-sized squash—but it was apparently a common snack for mastodons. Christopher Intagliata reports.

October 31, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Bird Egg Colors Are Influenced by Local Climate

In cold, northern climates, eggs tend to be darker and browner—heat-trapping colors that allow parents to spend a bit more time away from the nest. Christopher Intagliata reports. ...

October 29, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Crabs Do a Maze

Green crabs learned to navigate a maze without making a single wrong turn—and remembered the skill weeks later. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

October 28, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Your Skull Shapes Your Hearing

The resonant properties of your skull can amplify some frequencies and dampen others—and, in some cases, affect your hearing. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

October 17, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Nature Docs Avoid Habitat Destruction

BBC and Netflix nature documentaries consistently shy away from showing viewers the true extent to which we’ve damaged the planet. Christopher Intagliata reports.

September 24, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Early Butchers Used Small Stone Scalpels

Homo erectus used hand axes to butcher elephants and other game. But a new study suggests they also used finer, more sophisticated blades. Christopher Intagliata reports.

September 18, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

Squirrels constantly scan their surroundings for hawks, owls and other predators. But they also surveil for threats by eavesdropping on bird chatter. Christopher Intagliata reports. ...

September 12, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata
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