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Biology9766 articles archived since 1845

Genetic Tweak Gave Early Humans a Leg Up

A mutation in a key gene may have endowed humans with superior endurance—allowing them to compete better with other animals on the savanna. Christopher Intagliata reports.

September 13, 2018 — Christopher Intagliata

Survey the Wildlife of the "Great Indoors"

Biologists are enlisting citizen scientists to poke around under the sink and behind the curtains, for wildlife living in the "great indoors." Karen Hopkin reports.

September 10, 2018 — Karen Hopkin

Bonnethead Sharks Are Underwater Lawn Mowers

The hammerhead relatives consume copious amounts of sea grass, and have the digestive machinery to process it—making them true omnivores. Christopher Intagliata reports.

September 6, 2018 — Christopher Intagliata

Hawk Moths Hold Steady When Faced with Turbulence

Hawk moths hover while they feed, but they recover surprisingly quickly when knocked off-balance. Scientists use high-speed video and mini-cannons made of plastic toy parts to understand how hawk moths respond to disturbances mid-air. "Lens of Time: The Art of Staying Stable" was first published on bioGraphic © 2018 California Academy of Science.

September 6, 2018 — bioGraphic

Here's Looking at Humanity, Kid

Senior Editor Gary Stix talks about the September special issue of Scientific American, devoted to the science of being human. And Brown University evolutionary biologist Ken Miller discusses human chromosome 2 and what it tells us about us.

September 5, 2018 — Gary Stix and Steve Mirsky

Freeloading Ants Help the Workflow

Fire ants tunnels got excavated efficiently by only a small percentage of the group doing most of the work, thus avoiding pileups in tight spaces.

August 21, 2018 — Daniel Ackerman