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Biology9869 articles archived since 1845

Science News Briefs from the World Over

A few brief reports about international science and technology from Papua New Guinea to Kazakhstan, including one on the slow slide of Mount Etna in Italy.

January 29, 2019 — Emiliano Rodríguez Mega

Intimate Hermit Crab Keeps Shell On

A species of hermit crab appears to have evolved a large penis to enable intercourse without leaving, and thus possibly losing, its adopted shell.

January 25, 2019 — Karen Hopkin

Ecologists Eavesdrop with Bioacoustics

By coupling audio recordings with satellite data and camera traps, ecologists can keep their eyes—and ears—on protected tropical forests. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 24, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Resurrecting the Genes of Extinct Plants

Scientists at Ginkgo Bioworks have resurrected the smell of an extinct flower by putting together the pieces of its DNA. To learn more, read the full story here.

January 18, 2019 — Deboki Chakravarti

Ants Stick to Cliques to Dodge Disease

Ants infected with fungal pathogens steer clear of other cliques within the colony—avoiding wider infection, and allowing for a sort of immunity. Lucy Huang reports. 

January 16, 2019 — Lucy Huang

Mistimed Migration Means Bird Death Battles

Climate change is shifting population numbers and nest building by resident and migratory birds in Europe—sometimes leading to deadly conflict. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 13, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Monogamy May Be Written in Our Genes

In animal studies, a set of 24 genes involved in neural development, learning and memory, and cognition, seem to be associated with monogamy. Karen Hopkin reports.

January 11, 2019 — Karen Hopkin

Introducing Scientific American Health & Medicine

Introducing Scientific American Health & Medicine