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Arctic creepy-crawlies part II: woolly bear caterpillars

This is the second part of my two-part mini series on Arctic creepy-crawlies. Part I: ice worms can be found here. Part II: Woolly bear caterpillar The Arctic woolly bear moth (Gynaephora groenlandica) is found in Greenland and Canada around the Arctic Circle.

June 29, 2014 — S.E. Gould

Plenty of Pheromones in the Sea

As we sat in my car outside a silent movie theater in Los Angeles, my friend anxiously opened a plastic bag containing a white T-shirt she’d slept in for the past three nights.

December 6, 2013 — Julia Calderone

Octopus-Inspired Camouflage Flashes to Life in Smart Material

Octopuses and their cephalopod cousins are the undisputed masters of disguise. An octopus can change its color, texture and luminosity faster than you can say “camouflage.” So far our lowly human attempts at imitation have been quite crude.

August 21, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage

Do Our Bonds With Animals Survive Death?

Grover Krantz was onto something when he had his remains donated to science. A professor of anthropology, he didn't see why death should interrupt his life-long teaching.

October 17, 2014 — Julie Hecht

Funnel-Shaped Animals Invented Reefs Prior to Cambrian Explosion

Scientists have long thought of the Cambrian Explosion 541 million years ago as the flowering of complex life on Earth. Strangely shaped, large soft-bodied organisms were known to have lived in the period just prior — the Ediacaran — but they made few hard parts and scientists have debated whether any or how many were [...]

July 2, 2014 — Jennifer Frazer

The Richest Reef: A Symbiotic Society

Editor's Note: "The Richest Reef" follows members of a scientific dive team as they attempt to pinpoint the center of the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem in the world.

May 1, 2015 — Steven Bedard

Ahoy! Thar Be a New Seadragon in the Briny Deep

As fabulous, fantastical gems of evolution go, seadragons are hard to beat. The weedy seadgragon: “Weedy seadragon-Phyllopteryx taeniolatus” by Sylke Rohrlach – http://www.flickr.com/photos/87895263@N06/11259275943/sizes/l/in/photostream/.

March 24, 2015 — Jennifer Frazer

28 Santa-Approved Dog Science Articles

Can't believe so-and-so said that in front of everyone? Is it time for a break from members of your own species? The dogs are here to help.

December 25, 2014 — Julie Hecht
Wordless Wednesday: Pouched Rat Research Gif

Wordless Wednesday: Pouched Rat Research Gif

This is a series of shots of me cleaning this Barnes Maze between behavioral observations of my research subjects, the African Giant Pouched Rat, Cricetomys ansorgei.  The diameter of the table or Barnes Maze is 6 feet across, and is nearly feet off of the ground.

March 26, 2014 — DNLee

Health: Are Octopuses Rocking Too Much Heavy Metal?

Octopuses are a popular entrée for plenty of predators—including us humans. And for good reason. Octopuses are nutritious, with loads of lean muscle in those amazing arms, and plenty of good minerals.

May 8, 2014 — Katherine Harmon Courage
Spiny Baby Sea Bass Illustrates Surprising Physiques of Young Fish

Spiny Baby Sea Bass Illustrates Surprising Physiques of Young Fish

Among divers and marine biologists, it’s common knowledge that ocean fish lead double lives. Like birds and butterflies, their young often look nothing like the adults, but unlike birds and butterflies, it is the young that are often more beautiful and ornate than their parents.

May 27, 2014 — Jennifer Frazer
Wordless Wednesday: Research Snapshots 4

Wordless Wednesday: Research Snapshots 4

Because I know you all have missed seeing the rats. Here are some photos of the most adorable research subjects, EVER!! These photos are from novel food introduction tests.

February 26, 2014 — DNLee

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