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Biology9104 articles archived since 1845

Secrets of Life in a Spoonful of Blood

The intricate development of the fetus is yielding its long-held secrets to state-of-the-art molecular technologies that can make use of the mother's blood

February 9, 2017 — Claire Ainsworth and Nature magazine

Frog Spit Behaves Like Bug-Catching Ketchup

The amphibians' saliva is what's known as a "shear-thinning fluid," like ketchup—sometimes thick, sometimes thin and flowing. Christopher Intagliata reports.

February 6, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Hawaiian Crows Ready for the Call of the Wild

The critically endangered birds have done well in captive breeding, meaning they may be ready once more for wild living, and the repertoire of calls associated with it. Jason G. Goldman reports. 

January 30, 2017 — Jason G. Goldman

Rapid-Response Vaccines for Epidemic Outbreaks

Trevor Mundel, president of global health at the Gates Foundation, talks to Scientific American editor-in-chief Mariette DiChristina about the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) and the efforts to create vaccine platforms for rapid responses to epidemics. 

January 30, 2017 — Mariette DiChristina and Steve Mirsky

A Humble Fish with a Colorful Edge

The cichlid, a small fish, has one of the most incredible visual systems known—which allows it to adapt to differently colored environments. Jason G. Goldman reports.

January 28, 2017 — Jason G. Goldman

Stand Up for Science Journalism!

Staying informed has never been more important.