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Stories by Christopher Intagliata

Listen to the Sounds of Knees Cracking

Eavesdropping on the creaks and groans of an athlete’s knee could help doctors track healing after injury or surgery.

August 19, 2016 — Benjamin Meyers and Christopher Intagliata

Inbred Songbirds Croon out of Tune

Inbred canaries sang songs with less pure tones, and at slightly different pitches, than their outbred cousins—and female canaries seemed to be able to tell the difference.  ...

July 28, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata

For Lichens, 3's Not a Crowd

Biologists have identified a third species—a yeast—in some lichens, shaking up what's always been known as a two-party system. Christopher Intagliata reports.

July 21, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata

Chicken Scent Deters Malaria Mosquitoes

The smell of a chicken wards off one species of malaria-spreading mosquito—meaning the scent compounds, or the birds themselves, might help deter disease. Christopher Intagliata reports...

July 20, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata

Fuel-Efficient Engines Have a Sooty Flaw

A newer type of fuel injection offers better fuel economy, but paradoxically increases black carbon emissions—meaning a pollution trade-off. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

July 16, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata

Bees Rank Pollen by Taste

The discerning insects returned to flowers with sweetened pollen, but avoided revisiting flowers with bitter pollen. Christopher Intagliata reports.

July 13, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata

Chocolate Makers Cut Fat with Electricity

Reducing fat from chocolate can gum up manufacturing equipment, making low-fat chocolate hard to produce—but an electric field can help. Christopher Intagliata reports.

June 23, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata
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Scientific American Health & Medicine

Scientific American Health & Medicine