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Stories by Christopher Intagliata

Last Woollies Had Mammoth Mutations

The final holdout woolly mammoths had large numbers of harmful mutations—which would have given them satiny coats and a weakened sense of smell. Christopher Intagliata reports.

March 2, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Blood Cells Remember Your Mountain Vacation

Red blood cells retain a memory of high-altitude exposure, allowing for faster acclimation next time. But that memory fades within four months. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

February 23, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Heat Sensor Has Snaky Sensitivity

Researchers have developed a heat sensor that can detect temperature changes of just ten thousandths of a degree Celsius—comparable with the sensitivity of pit vipers. Christopher Intagliata reports.

February 15, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Cool Coating Chills in Sunlight

A thin film coating can chill a vat of water to 15 degress Fahrenheit cooler than its surroundings, by absorbing—and then emitting—the sun's infrared rays. Christopher Intagliata reports.

February 13, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Frog Spit Behaves Like Bug-Catching Ketchup

The amphibians' saliva is what's known as a "shear-thinning fluid," like ketchup—sometimes thick, sometimes thin and flowing. Christopher Intagliata reports.

February 6, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

LSD's Long, Strange Trip Explained

When LSD binds to serotonin receptors, it pulls a "lid" closed behind it, locking it in place for hours, and explaining its long-lasting effects. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

January 26, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata
Pesticide Additive Could Be One Culprit in Bee Deaths

Pesticide Additive Could Be One Culprit in Bee Deaths

A common pesticide additive, known as an "inert" ingredient, could be one of the causes of the die-offs beekeepers have observed in their hives. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 21, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata
Knot Not Easy to Knot

Knot Not Easy to Knot

Chemists have synthesized the most complex molecular knot ever, using a strand just 192 atoms long. The advance could lead to new tougher materials. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 18, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata
Bat Chatter Is More Than a Cry in the Dark

Bat Chatter Is More Than a Cry in the Dark

Using algorithms developed for human speech recognition, researchers decoded which bats in an experimental colony were arguing with each other, and what they were arguing about. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 14, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Hair Cells Could Heal Skin Sans Scars

Hair follicles appear to be key in reprogramming other cells in the wound, restoring the original skin architecture, instead of simply scarring. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

January 6, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

Concrete Defects Could Become Strengths

By optimizing the imperfections in concrete, manufacturers could make the material tougher and stronger—allowing builders to use less of it. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

January 5, 2017 — Christopher Intagliata

When Dining for Trillions, Eat Wisely

What you ate in the past can shape the diversity of your gut flora, and affect how well your gut microbes respond to new foods. Christopher Intagliata reports.

December 29, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata

Isolated Low Temps May Reassure Climate Skeptics

Areas of the country that have experienced record low temperatures since 2005 happen to be home to many global warming deniers. And researchers theorize there may be a connection. Christopher Intagliata reports.

December 26, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata
"Necrobiome" Reveals a Corpse's Time of Death

"Necrobiome" Reveals a Corpse's Time of Death

The microbial ecosystems inhabiting corpses could help forensic scientists determine a person’s time of death, even after almost two months. Christopher Intagliata reports.

December 22, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata

Pregnancy Primes the Brain for Motherhood

Areas of the brain related to social cognition shrink in first-time mothers—a structural change that could boost maternal attachment. Christopher Intagliata reports. 

December 19, 2016 — Christopher Intagliata
Stories by Christopher Intagliata

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